IRC Awards 2004 - Young Scientist Award

Toshihiko Takemura

Associate Prof., Kyushu University

Toshihiko Takemura

Dr. Takemura received the title of doctor of science from the University of Tokyo in 2001 following the completion of his dissertation entitled "A Study on Aerosol Distribution and Optical Properties with a Global Climate Model" (after only a two and one-half doctoral course discipline), and he is now serving as an assistant professor in Kyushu University. Since completing his degree, Dr. Takemura has published 7 first-authored papers in internationally recognized journals. His biggest contribution to the atmospheric radiation community has been the development of an aerosol chemical transport model-SPRINTARS (Spectral Radiation-Transport Model for Aerosol Species) that can treat the radiative properties of four aerosol types, i.e., sulfate, carbonaceous, mineral dust, and sea-salt aerosols. Results from combining this model with the CCSR/NIES Atmospheric General Circulation Model and global distributions of aerosol concentration and radiative characteristics were published in 2000 (Takemura et al., 2000), at a time when very few GCMs in the world could treat four aerosol types. This contribution led to himbeing awarded the Yamamoto-Shono Award of Meteorological Society of Japan for young scientists. He compared, for the first time in the world, model-simulated single scattering albedos with those observed from NASA AERONET, and calculated the radiative forcing due to the direct effect of anthropogenic aerosols as -0.19 W/m2 (Takemura et al. ,2002). This small forcing is regarded as more realistic in the present view than the -0.5 W/m2 value previously estimated by the IPCC (2001). He has carried out several other interesting studies, such as a simulation of long-range transport of Asian mineral dust storm particles to the North American Continent and so on. He is now playing an important role in the climate modeling community. These outstanding contributionsled the IRC to present Dr. Takemura with the 2004 IRC Young Scientist Award.